Smuggler Background


 from Smuggler

         I hoisted my bag over my shoulder, bypassing the baggage carousels where a cop was walking around with a dog, and headed towards the doors. A single Customs Agent was perched on a stool to the far right, reading a magazine. As I got about a third of the way there, he seemed to stir. I changed direction ever so slightly.
         He roused himself. A small group was moving toward him from the right, but he seemed to ignore them.
         I looked out the corner of my eyes for someone, anyone I could fall in behind, but everyone seemed blissfully out of reach—and I imagined this is what it must feel like to drown: to take one last desperate look at help swimming strongly away.
         Then the agent sauntered ever so slowly out into the middle of the room. My heart raced. Then he looked up. I saw it coming, could feel it coming. Oblivious to the rest of the herd, he’d singled me out; and for a second I felt I might just swoon right there. Then some sort of instinct kicked in. I resigned myself to being questioned and headed right at him.
         For some seconds he hung back as I did my best to play the part of the unassuming traveler.
         “Where are you coming from, sir?” he asked, at an angle.
         “Paris,” I said.
         “Can I see your ticket?”
         I handed him my ticket.
         “How long were you in Paris?”
         “A week.”
         “What were you doing there?”
         “What kind of business.”
         “Magazine. Publishing.”
         “What magazine?”
         And here I faltered. Nun Civa Orcus. What the fuck was thatMy mind raced for all sorts of explanations. For a second I considered making something up. But that would only mean trouble. You tend to say stupid things when you veer from the script like that. Someone might ask your name, for instance, and under duress you might say Peter Rabbit or Dick Nixon. Who the hell knew? Had he detected my hesitation? I had to speak.